Gardening

Thursday, September 08, 2005

Bug repellent when you are in your garden.

The Best Bug Repellent is All-Natural


(ARA) - If you'll be spending any time outdoors during the summer months, there are two precautions you need to take -- put on sunscreen to protect yourself and your kids from the damaging rays of the sun, and bug spray to keep biting insects at bay.

Most bug sprays on the market today are safe when used as directed, but Allen Jones, spokesman for Bite Blocker, an all-natural bug spray, points out serious problems with insect repellants that contain DEET, a chemical bug repellent developed 50 years ago by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) for the Army. "The federal EPA claims it's safe when used as directed, yet most people are unaware of the problems sprays containing DEET can cause and simply use it as needed any way. They don't take the time to read the warnings in small print on the label, and the label doesn't explain the problems over exposure can cause. That should send up a red flag. I'd much rather use a repellent that is safe to apply as needed rather than as directed."
 
 

Coping with allergies in your garden

The Allergy Sufferers' Guide to Gardening

 

 See the following advice for gardening enthusiasts to help them get down and dirty in the garden, while minimizing their allergy symptoms: 

Check the Pollen Count -- Avoid gardening between 5:00 and 10:00 a.m., when pollen levels are at their highest. Visit www.benadrylusa.com daily to check the pollen count in your local area.

What's the Weather? -- Avoid spending time in the garden when it is windy outside. The wind stirs up pollen and spreads it throughout the garden, which can exasperate your allergies.

Arm Yourself -- Allergy sufferers should have a proven effective medicine, such as Benadryl Allergy, on hand to relieve their worst symptoms like sneezing, coughing, itchy and watery eyes, runny nose and itchy throat.

Protect Yourself -- Wearing a mask and protective goggles when gardening will help protect your mouth and eyes from coming in contact with allergens in the air, such as tree, weed and grass pollens.

Use the Right Plants -- Avoid using plants that have small flowers; they tend to produce more pollen. Try using tulips, begonias, roses or daffodils. Refrain from using male trees and shrubs in your garden since they are the only sex that produces pollen. Consult your local gardening shop to determine if a plant is male or female.

Water Frequently -- Regularly water the garden's soil to keep allergens from rising. Also, replace straw with black plastic mulch, rocks or gravel.

Wash Away Allergens -- After spending time in the garden, be sure to thoroughly rinse your hands, clothes and hair. Allergens from outside can easily be carried into your home continuing to aggravate your allergies.
 
 

Gardens, plants and watering

Don't Drown Your Plants, Nurture Them with Micro/Drip Irrigation

Conserving water for generations to come

(ARA) - Now that spring is here, garden centers across the country are once again bustling with activity. There are house plants, fruit trees and vegetables as far as the eye can see, and they all look great. So how do you keep them looking that way once you get them home? 

"The secret is in the way you water them," says Susan Thayer, who is an expert in landscape irrigation. Thayer owns and operates the Southern Citrus Nursery in Dundee, Fla., as well as Mister Landscaper, a company that specializes in low-volume landscape irrigation. 
 

The Allergy Sufferers' Guide to Gardening

Actor and Gardening Enthusiast Dean Cain Offers Tips for Creating a "Sneeze-Free" Garden

(ARA) - According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, more than 35 million people suffer from allergies which may prohibit them from participating in many outdoor activities, including gardening. Notable film and television star Dean Cain is one of them. 

"I love spending time outside, especially with my four year-old son," comments Cain, "but my allergies prevent me from enjoying some of our favorite outdoor hobbies. One of our favorite things to do every morning is to pick fresh oranges from our orange trees and cut fresh flowers from the garden. By creating an allergy-friendly environment and taking a proven effective medication like Benadryl to relieve my allergy symptoms, I can enjoy outdoor activities without any problems."

Dean offers the following advice for gardening enthusiasts to help them get down and dirty in the garden, while minimizing their allergy symptoms: 
 
 
 
 

Dealing with the battle of the weeds.

Weed Control Facts, Winning the Battle of the Weeds

Keeping your landscape plantings, flower beds, and nursery crops free of weeds is a battle, but if you approach it with a strategic plan, you will prevail. In order to develop a plan, you first must understand how weeds work, and what kind of weeds you are dealing with. 

Basically weeds grow either from seed, or they reproduce from their roots. As the roots grow outward from the parent plant new plants sprout up from the lateral roots, creating more parent plants and the process continues and the weeds thrive. Weeds that tend to reproduce from the root are usually more difficult to control. 

Weed controls facts?  Weeds are plants, and they function just like the desirable plants in your yard. They need water, sunlight, and nutrition to survive. Of these three key survival needs, the easiest one for a gardener to eliminate is sunlight. Through proper mulching you can eliminate the sunlight.